Tr5

 

Tr5_1

 

Tr5-65 + 17C1-65 (Orenstein & Koppel 8961/1921), photographed at the Wolsztyn shed on September 8, 2004.

 

Tr5_2

 

On April 30, 2005, Tr5-65 took part in the traditional Steam Locomotives Parade in Wolsztyn

 

Tr5_3

 

…arising much interest…

 

Tr5_4

 

…opening the parade, as the oldest engine participating, …

 

Tr5_5

 

…and posing by the signal box.

 

Tr5_sc

 

Side drawing of the 562-8 © Lokomotiv-Revue (from TB vol.1).

 

Tr5_6

 

Another picture of the Tr5-65 at the Wolsztyn depot...

 

Tr5_7

 

... and steaming past a group of railway fans; both these pictures were taken during the Steam Locomotive Parade on April 29, 2006.

 

A few pictures taken during the 2007 Parade can be seen here.

 

On July 29, 2006, Tr5-65 participated in the locomotive gala at the Chabówka heritage park; some photos can be found here.

 

Tr5_8

 

Wolsztyn again: Tr5-65 at the 15th Steam Locomotive Show, May 3, 2008.

 

Tr5_9

 

Tr5-65 as a guest star at ‘Parowozjada 2009’: Chabówka station, September 5, 2009.

 

 

The same engine, but in much poorer condition, photographed at the Łazy depot on May 21, 1990, a few months before the transfer to Jaworzyna Śląska. Photo from my collection.

 

Prussian state railways KPEV (Königlich Preußische Eisenbahnverwaltung) before and during WWI ordered large numbers of freight locomotives with the 0-4-0 axle arrangement. 1205 G71s, 1646 G72s and 200 G9s, built between 1893 and 1917, ran on saturated steam. They were quickly supplemented by 1054 G8s, first Prussian freighters with steam superheating. Development of the latter, classed G81, was one of the most successful and certainly the most numerous Prussian engine: between 1912 and 1921 KPEV received 4934 examples.

In early 1930s DRG still had over 3000 G81s, classed 5525-56,58. Running qualities of these comparatively new locomotives, with modern and efficient boilers, had already become unsatisfactory: due to axle arrangement their maximum speed was only 55 km/h. Following the appearance of more powerful types (mainly 1-5-0s) they were relegated to branch lines, but for such duties axle load of 17.5 tonnes was too high. Launching a reconstruction program was certainly justified and in 1934 Borsig proposed fitting lead Bissel truck. In order to achieve proper weight distribution, side sills had to be lengthened and strengthened, and boiler shifted forward by 720 mm and raised by 80 mm. Maximum speed could be increased to 70 km/h; however, due to lower weight on drivers, this was accompanied by tractive effort decrease from 14.4 to 13 tonnes. This project was accepted and ten engines were soon rebuilt by Borsig; as far as I know, the first one was 55 5373 (ex-KPEV Stettin 5281, Vulcan 3585/1920). Further rebuilds were performed by various railway stock repair works and until 1941 this program involved 691 locomotives, re-classed 562-8; some of them received their numbers for the second time, after classes G4/5N and G4/5H (Königlich Bayerische Staatsbahn), VIIIe (Badische Staatsbahn) and several more ‘exotic’ classes withdrawn from DRG in late 1920s and early 1930s.

Rebuilt G81s proved very useful, mainly on local lines with light freight and mixed traffic. They had sufficient tractive effort at moderate axle load of 16.2 tonnes; no wonder, thus, that during the war many were transferred to the East, where weak tracks were commonplace. After the war, DB were left with 367 machines, which remained in service until 1967; DR had only 59, last of which were written off two years later. Several examples went to the USSR as war booty, but their number is difficult to estimate. Soviets classed most (perhaps all) ex-DRG 56s with two-cylinder single expansion engines at class TO, but this referred not only to 562-8s. Last of them were withdrawn from the MPS (Ministry of Transport) service in 1957.

After the war, PKP received 66 locomotives of this class, initially scattered throughout the country; soon, however, most of them were transferred to Upper and Lower Silesia, where they remained until the end of their service. Classed Tr5, they were used mainly with light freight trains, but also saw some passenger service. Later some were relegated to switching. Most survived until late 1960s, last were withdrawn in summer 1972. A few remained in use in the role of stationary boilers until 1974.

By a strange decree of fate, of this once quite numerous class only one machine has survived in Europe until today – and it is still operational! Tr5-65 (Orenstein & Koppel 8961/1921, KPEV Stettin 5312, then DRG 55 5607, rebuilt at RAW Schneidemühl in January 1938 and renumbered 56 511), written off in 1972, was first kept at the Jaworzyna Śląska depot. Overhauled, or rather reconstructed, in 1994 by ZNTK Piła (now Interlok), it was restored in service as a heritage locomotive. After a major overhaul in Gniezno between December 2000 and May 2002 it was transferred to the Wolsztyn depot and sometimes hauls special trains. In fact it is the second machine to bear this DRG service number: first 56 511 (Hartmann 2920/1906, SäSt 764) was written off in 1926.

 

 


Main technical data

 

No.

Parameter

Unit

Value

1.

Years of manufacture

-

1933 – 19411)

2.

Total built / used in Poland

-

6911) / 66

3.

Tender class

-

17C1

4.

Axle arrangement

-

1-4-0

5.

Design maximum speed

km/h

70

6.

Cylinder bore

mm

2 X 600

7.

Piston stroke

mm

660

8.

Engine rating

kW/hp

926 / 1260

9.

Tractive effort

kG

13 000

10.

Boiler pressure

MPa

1.43

11.

Grate dimensions

m X m

2.63 X 1.01

12.

Firebox heating surface

m2

13.89

13.

Distance between tube plates

mm

4 500

14.

Number of flue tubes

-

139

15.

Heating surface of flue tubes

m2

90.2

16.

Number of smoke tubes

-

24

17.

Heating surface of smoke tubes

m2

42.11

18.

Evaporating surface, total

m2

146.2

19.

Superheater heating surface

m2

46.02)

20.

Diameter of drivers

mm

1350

21.

Diameter of idlers front/rear

mm

850 / -

22.

Total weight, empty

kg

68 310

23.

Total weight, working order

kg

74 600

24.

Weight on drivers, working order

kg

64 100

25.

Weight with tender, empty

kg

90 310

26.

Weight with tender, working order

kg

120 100

27.

Maximum axle load

T

16.2

28.

Axle base (with tender)

mm

14 935

29.

Overall length (with tender)

mm

18 296

30.

Brake type

-

Westinghouse

 

1)      All rebuilt from G81s – some sources give 688 examples.

2)      Some sources give 51.9 m2 – possibly differences depending on the manufacturer.

 

References and acknowledgments

 

-       Monographic article by Paweł Terczyński (SK vol. 1/1995);

-       www.parowozy.best.net (website by Michał ‘Doctor’ Pawełczyk);

-       TB vol.1, AP