TKbb101

 

 

Factory photo of the SäStB No. 1388 (Hartmann 3680/1913). Re-numbered 98 011 by DRG, this engine remained in use with DR until November 1962. Source: Lokomotiv-Archiv Sachsen 2 (see References).

 

 

DR 98 001 (ex SäStB 1394, Hartmann 3377/1910), location unknown. This picture was taken in August 1971, probably prior to or during transfer to Verkehrsmuseum Dresden. Photo by Werner Nagel (from my collection).

 

 

98 001 can now be seen at the Industriemuseum Chemnitz; photo taken by Norbert Kaiser on October 17, 2015 (www.commons.wikimedia.org).

 

 

Side drawing of class I TV in its earlier variant (batches built in 1910 and 1913); broken lines indicate sandboxes as fitted to several examples. Two Polish locomotives represented this version. Source: Lokomotiv-Archiv Sachsen 2 (see References).

 

 

Side drawing of class I TV in its final form, as built in 1914; a single engine of this version served with PKP. Source: as above.

 

 

 

 

Although Saxon class I TV tender locomotives did see some service with PKP, their designation is subject to doubt. List of locomotives, issued by the Ministry of Railways in 1920, makes mention of them under a provisional designation T145. According to some sources, class designations TKbb101 or TKp102 was reserved for them, but actually never assigned, as they were withdrawn before new system came into use. The former designation, indicating axle arrangement in a somehow illustrative manner, seems more likely; the latter has not been confirmed by reliable sources.

Meyer-type locomotives saw some use in Europe, South Africa and South America, but were much less popular than other types of articulated locomotives, like Mallet or Garratt. In Europe, their principal user were state railways of Saxony Sächsische Staatsbahn (SäStB), both on standard-gauge and narrow-gauge lines. The most popular class IV K for the 750 mm track numbered 96 examples, built by Sächsische Maschinenfabrik (Hartmann) of Chemnitz between 1892 and 1921, of which as many as 22 have been preserved. These engines were particularly useful on mountain lines, combining high tractive effort with ability to negotiate tight curves. In 1890, Hartmann built two standard-gauge Meyer locomotives for SäStB, No. 822 ‘Raschau’ and No. 823 ‘Crottendorf’ (class H M I TV, later M I TV). They ran on saturated steam, were fitted with four-cylinder compound steam engines and featured 0-2-2-0 axle arrangement. Both remained in use until 1922. Operational experience with these locomotives must have been encouraging, as in 1910 a thoroughly modified version appeared, with reversed cylinder array (low-pressure cylinders driving rear instead of front wheelsets), increased cylinder bore and piston stroke, enlarged boiler with higher steam pressure, Westinghouse brakes and many other improvements. eighteen examples, classed I TV, were built between 1910 and 1914 (service numbers 1381 through 1398). One more was ordered by Oberhohndorf-Reinsdorfer Kohlenbahn and delivered in 1910. Individual examples differed in details such as shape of water boxes and cab and location of sandboxes on the boiler; in all, three versions can be distinguished. In 1910 two above-mentioned class M I TV locomotives were re-classed I TV and re-numbered 1399 and 1400.

After WWI, fifteen locomotives of this type remained in Germany and were later given DRG service numbers 98 001 through 015. Seven were written off in the 1930s and 1940s; the rest served with DR until 1960s. The last one, 98 001 (ex No. 1394, Hartmann 3377/1910), withdrawn in August 1971, has been preserved and is currently on display at the Industriemuseum Chemnitz. Following closure of the Oberhohndorf-Reinsdorfer Kohlenbahn in 1939, their sole I TV was impressed into DRG as 98 015 (second with this number) and remained in use until November 1966. Three remaining locomotives of this type were taken over by PKP in Warsaw in 1918. Probably they had been brought there by German authorities after the city had been taken in 1915; if so, it is somehow surprising why these engines, built for mountain lines, finally ended up in Polish lowlands. They were No. 1398 (Hartmann 3380/1910), No. 1389 (Hartmann 3414/1910) and No. 1384 (Hartmann 3764/1914). Virtually nothing is known about their service, apart from the fact that it was rather short: all are mentioned in the 1920 locomotive list (see above), but disappeared before 1927. According to the Hartmann factory list (see References), No. 1384 was withdrawn as early as in 1920.

 


Main technical data

 

No.

Parameter

Unit

Value

1.

Years of manufacture

-

1910 – 1914

2.

Total built / used in Poland

-

9 / 3

3.

Tender class

-

-

4.

Axle arrangement

-

0-2-2-0

5.

Design maximum speed

km/h

50

6.

Cylinder bore

mm

2 X 360 / 2 X 570

7.

Piston stroke

mm

630

8.

Engine rating

kW/hp

9.

Tractive effort

kG

10.

Boiler pressure

MPa

1.33

11.

Grate dimensions

m X m

1.6 m2

12.

Firebox heating surface

m2

6.8

13.

Distance between tube plates

mm

3 700

14.

Number of flue tubes

-

199

15.

Heating surface of flue tubes

m2

92.5

16.

Number of smoke tubes

-

-

17.

Heating surface of smoke tubes

m2

-

18.

Evaporating surface, total

m2

99.3

19.

Superheater heating surface

m2

-

20.

Diameter of drivers

mm

1 260

21.

Diameter of idlers front/rear

mm

- / -

22.

Total weight, empty

kg

50 400

23.

Total weight, working order

kg

61 500

24.

Weight on drivers, working order

kg

61 500

25.

Weight with tender, empty

kg

-

26.

Weight with tender, working order

kg

-

27.

Maximum axle load

T

15.4

28.

Axle base (with tender)

mm

7 700

29.

Overall length (with tender)

mm

11 624

30.

Brake type

-

Westinghouse

 

 

References and acknowledgments

 

-        Lokomotiv-Archiv Sachsen 2 by F. Näbrich, G. Meyer and R. Preuss (Transpress, Berlin, 1984);

-        www.de.wikipedia.org;

-        Charakterystyka parowozów (Characteristics of Steam Locomotives), Ministry of Railways, Warsaw, 1920;

-        http://www.beitraege.lokomotive.de/datenbank (website by Ingo Hütter);

-        Hartmann factory list compiled by Jens Merte (available from www.werkbahn.de).