Ol11

 

 

Factory photo of the 329.01 (WLF 1652/1907). After the war this locomotive became ČSD 354.650 and was withdrawn in 1965. Source: www.de.wikipedia.org.

 

 

Hungarian IIIt 3782 (StEG 3579/1909), later 323,032, remained in the MÁV service until 1962. Source: www.hu.wikipedia.org.

 

 

An unknown Ol11, photographed in Sucha (now Sucha Beskidzka) in 1920s or 1930s. Photo by Jan Kawecki (courtesy Michał Kawecki).

 

 

 

 

The 1-3-1 axle arrangement, known as Prairie, was very popular in the USA and Europe. Austro-Hungarian railways were no exception. Between 1904 and 1917 state railways kkStB (kaiserlich-königliche Staatsbahnen) took delivery of 239 class 229 tender locomotives, which played an important role in passenger traffic. They featured compound steam engine, ran on saturated steam and were fitted with Gölsdorf-Clench steam dryer. In order to develop an engine more suitable for long-distance service, Karl Gölsdorf designed a tender locomotive based on class 229. Frame and wheelsets were almost unchanged, apart from increasing the distance between pony truck and first drivers by 30 mm. Prototype was built in 1907 by WLF (aka Floridsdorf, s/n 1652) and this type was ordered in quantity by both kkStB (class 329) and Hungarian state railways MÁV (class IIIt, later re-classed 323). Production continued until 1909 at WLF (14 examples for kkStB and 18 for MÁV), Wiener Neustadt (20 and 18), StEG (32 and 18) and BMMF (aka PČM, 27 and 11). In all, 93 examples went to kkStB and 65 to MÁV. Furthermore, in 1908 Wiener Neustadt built two engines of this type for k.u.k. Heeresbahn Banjaluka-Doberlin, former part of the Ottoman Railway taken over after the annexation of Bosnia and Herzegovina (service numbers 61 and 62). This gives the grand total of 150 examples. Gölsdorf-Clench steam dryer was later removed, due to problems with tightness. Class 329 was supplanted by its development with steam superheating. Classed 429, this locomotive remained in production until 1918, 386 examples being built in both compound and single-expansion variants. The latter also served with PKP as class Ol12.

After the war these comparatively new locomotives were divided between several railway managements. Austrian state railways BBÖ kept twenty 329s; six were written off in 1937 and fourteen taken over by DRG and classed 351. MÁV were left with 26 examples. Czechoslovakian state railways ČSD took over 38 Austrian locomotives, of which 35 were later classed 354.6 and numbered 354.650 through 684. Between 1926 and 1931 all 38 engines were rebuilt with steam superheaters and single-expansion engines. They were given new service numbers, 354.601 through 638. Romanian railways CFR took over 35 MÁV engines, their class designation 323 and service numbers being retained. Most were withdrawn between 1937 and 1940, but 323.11 (WLF 1822/1908) remained in use until 1960. Railways of the Kingdom of Serbs, Croatians and Slovenians (SHS) received four locomotives from kkStB, four from MÁV (later JDŽ class 107) and two from the Banjaluka-Doberlin military railway (class 108). Italian state railways took over seven Austrian engines, classed 687, which remained in use until 1938. Three locomotives (329.74, 329.77 and 329.82) perished in Russia; they were reportedly used by short-lived Ukrainian railways, but no details are available.

Polish state railways PKP obtained 21 Austrian 329s, in 1926 classed Ol11. They were operated mainly in southern and south-eastern Poland and all survived until WWII. In 1939 fifteen became German war booty, joining their ex-BBÖ kinsmen in the DRG service as 35 115 through 129. Six fell into Soviet hands, but were not re-gauged and in 1941 were taken over by Germans. Four were impressed into DRG as 35 130 through 133, Ol11-7 was written off in 1941 and Ol11-10 served with Ostbahn with its original Polish service number. After the war PKP took back seven pre-war Ol11s plus four ex-BBÖ engines, numbered Ol11-1 through 11. They remained in use until mid-1950s. The last one, Ol11-2 (ex kkStB 329.33. later DRG 35 110, Wiener Neustadt 4902/1909) was withdrawn in 1956 and for a couple more years served as a stationary boiler at the ZNTK Łapy rolling stock repair works. Pre-war Ol11-9 was also returned, but not restored in service and written off in 1950. Between 1955 and 1956 two Ol11s were returned by ČSD (they had been given service numbers 354.6501 and 354.6502) and four by DR. Due to poor condition and obsolescence they were scrapped without being given new service numbers. Not a single locomotive of this type has survived until today.

 


Main technical data

 

No.

Parameter

Unit

Value

1.

Years of manufacture

-

1907 – 1909

2.

Total built / used in Poland

-

150 / 21

3.

Tender class

-

14C11

4.

Axle arrangement

-

1-3-1

5.

Design maximum speed

km/h

80

6.

Cylinder bore

mm

450 / 690

7.

Piston stroke

mm

720

8.

Engine rating

kW/hp

930 / 1265

9.

Tractive effort

kG

8 100

10.

Boiler pressure

MPa

1.53

11.

Grate dimensions

m X m

2.88 X 1.06

12.

Firebox heating surface

m2

14.2

13.

Distance between tube plates

mm

4 400

14.

Number of flue tubes

-

218

15.

Heating surface of flue tubes

m2

107.61)

16.

Number of smoke tubes

-

-

17.

Heating surface of smoke tubes

m2

-

18.

Evaporating surface, total

m2

121.8

19.

Superheater heating surface

m2

-

20.

Diameter of drivers

mm

1575

21.

Diameter of idlers front/rear

mm

830 / 830

22.

Total weight, empty

kg

54 200

23.

Total weight, working order

kg

59 700

24.

Weight on drivers, working order

kg

43 000

25.

Weight with tender, empty

kg

69 500

26.

Weight with tender, working order

kg

96 200

27.

Maximum axle load

T

14.4

28.

Axle base (with tender)

mm

13 845

29.

Overall length (with tender)

mm

16 916

30.

Brake type

-

Hardy, Westinghouse

 

1)     Plus 45.4 sq.m of steam dryer. With steam dryer removed, heating surface of flue tubes was increased to 153.7 sq.m.

 

 

References and acknowledgments

 

-       KT, EZ, LP, ITFR;

-       www.pospichal.net/lokstatistik (website by Josef Pospichal).